Call for papers/ Publicaciones

Posted on Actualizado enn

IMG_0787Source: IntLawGRRLS

On the Job! Women’s Initiatives for Gender Justice seeks Legal Consultant (deadline Aug. 20)

Women’s Initiatives for Gender Justice is seeking to hire a Legal Consultant for a 6-month period, with the possibility of extension. The Legal Consultant would be based in The Hague Office. Candidates are encouraged to apply as soon as possible; the deadline for applications is Wednesday, 20 August 2014.
The Women’s Initiatives for Gender Justice is an international women’s human rights organisation that advocates for accountability for gender-based crimes through the International Criminal Court (ICC) and domestic mechanisms, including through the participation of women in peace building and formal peace negotiation processes. The organisation works with women most affected by each of the armed conflict situations under investigation by the ICC.
The organisation has extensive country-based programmes in collaboration with local and regional partners in Uganda, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, and Libya, along with ICC-related legal monitoring and advocacy programmes on the Central African Republic, Kenya, the Ivory Coast and Mali. The organisation currently has offices in The Hague (The Netherlands) and Kitgum (Uganda).
The organisation has an immediate opening for a Legal Consultant. This is a temporary appointment for a 6-month period, with the possibility of extension. The Legal Consultant will be part of a small, highly efficient and motivated team, based in The Hague Office.
For more information on the position, please visit the job posting.

Source: IntLawGRRLS
Write On! Call for Papers: International Symposium on the Legacy of the ICTR
 
The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda is organizing an International Symposium on the Legacy of the ICTR to be held in Arusha, Tanzania, on 6-7 November 2014, and has issued a call for papers:
With the ICTR’s closure scheduled for 2015, the Symposium aims to provide an opportunity for experts in the field of international justice to reflect on the ICTR’s contributions to the development of international humanitarian law, administration of justice, and promotion of the rule of law, particularly in the Great Lakes Region. We invite experts in the field to submit proposals for papers to be presented during the Symposium. Papers should focus on the topics indicated in the draft program, which can be found here (pdf).
Those interested in presenting a paper at the Symposium should submit an application including a 300-word abstract summarizing the proposed paper via email to the ICTR Legacy Committee at ictrlegacy@un.org. Applications must include:
1) A 3o0-word abstract of the proposed paper;
2) The author’s name, title, and affiliation (if any);
3) The author’s Curriculum Vitae/Résumé; and
4) The author’s contact details including phone number and email address.
All applications must be received no later than 15 August 2014.
Successful applicants will receive an invitation to submit a paper by 5 September 2014 and a first draft of papers will be expected to be submitted by 17 October 2o14. Submission of an application will be considered as acknowledgement that the author is available to be in Arusha from 5-8 November 2014 to participate in the Symposium. The ICTR will endeavor to cover travel and accommodation for successful applicants.

Source: International Law Reporter

New Issue: International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics
The latest issue of International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics (Vol. 12, no. 3, September 2014) is out. Contents include:
•    Avidan Kent, Implementing the principle of policy integration: institutional interplay and the role of international organizations
•    Ayşem Mert, Hybrid governance mechanisms as political instruments: the case of sustainability partnerships
•    Mark Giordano, Alena Drieschova, James A. Duncan, Yoshiko Sayama, Lucia De Stefano, & Aaron T. Wolf, A review of the evolution and state of transboundary freshwater treaties
•    Tobias Dan Nielsen, The role of discourses in governing forests to combat climate change
•    Inés de Águeda Corneloup & Arthur P. J. Mol, Small island developing states and international climate change negotiations: the power of moral “leadership”
http://ilreports.blogspot.com/2014/08/rodman-intervention-and-justice-cascade.html
Rodman: Intervention and the ‘Justice Cascade’: Lessons from the Special Court for Sierra Leone on Prosecution and Civil War
Kenneth A. Rodman (Colby College – Government) has posted Intervention and the ‘Justice Cascade’: Lessons from the Special Court for Sierra Leone on Prosecution and Civil War (Human Rights Review, forthcoming). Here’s the abstract:
In the ‘Justice Cascade’, Kathryn Sikkink argues that “foreign prosecutions and international tribunals can be cost-effective alternatives to military intervention.” Yet, the successes of the Special Court for Sierra Leone—in prosecuting former Liberian President Charles Taylor and in imposing accountability on the leaders of all armed groups regardless of political alignment—were dependent on a commitment by Western powers and international and regional organizations to a military victory against the rebels in Sierra Leone and coercive regime change in Liberia. The lesson that should be drawn from this case—which parallels that of other international tribunals set up during ongoing violence—is that the prospects for international criminal justice during civil wars are dependent on the political strategies adopted by outsiders to address the conflict and that taking criminal accountability seriously requires an interventionist rather than a consent-based approach to conflict resolution.

Source: International Law Reporter

Burke-White: Crimea and the International Legal Order

William W. Burke-White (Univ. of Pennsylvania – Law) has posted Crimea and the International Legal Order. Here’s the abstract:
A key balance between two of the most fundamental principles of the post-World War II international legal and political order is at stake today in Ukraine. Particularly in its annexation of Crimea, Russia has exploited the tension between a fundamental principle that prohibits the acquisition of territory through the use of force and an equally fundamental right of self-determination. Russia’s reinterpretation of these two principles could well destabilize the tenuous balance between the protection of individual rights and the preservation of states’ territorial integrity that undergirds the post World War II order. In determining the precedent that will be remembered from the events in Crimea, the US must work to build legal and diplomatic coalitions that narrow exceptions and reaffirm the principles of the modern international order.

Source: International Law Reporter

New Issue: European Journal of International Law
The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 25, no. 2, May 2014) is out. Contents include:
•    Editorial
o    JHHW, Fateful Elections? Investing in the Future of Europe; Masthead Changes; In this Issue
•    EJIL: Keynote!
o    Anne Orford, Scientific Reason and the Discipline of International Law
•    Articles
o    Sergio Puig, Social Capital in the Arbitration Market
o    Tilmann Altwicker & Oliver Diggelmann, How is Progress Constructed in International Legal Scholarship?
o    Grégoire Mallard, Crafting the Nuclear Regime Complex (1950–1975): Dynamics of Harmonization of Opaque Treaty Rules
•    New Voices: A Selection from the Second Annual Junior Faculty Forum for International Law
o    Moria Paz, The Tower of Babel: Human Rights and the Paradox of Language
o    Arnulf Becker Lorca, Petitioning the International: A ‘Pre-history’ of Self-determination
•    Roaming Charges: Places of Social and Financial Crisis: Dublin 2014
•    EJIL: Debate!
o    László Blutman, Conceptual Confusion and Methodological Deficiencies: Some Ways that Theories on Customary International Law Fail
o    Andrew T. Guzman & Jerome Hsiang, Some Ways that Theories on Customary International Law Fail: A Reply to László Blutman
•    Critical Review of International Jurisprudence
o    Loveday Hodson, Women’s Rights and the Periphery: CEDAW’s Optional Protocol
•    Critical Review of International Governance
o    Wolfgang Hoffmann-Riem, The Venice Commission of the European Council – Standards and Impact

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