Call for Papers / Publicaciones

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IMG_0787Source: IntLawReporter

Baldez: Defying Convention: U.S. Resistance to the UN Treaty on Women’s Rights
 
Lisa Baldez (Dartmouth College – Government) has published Defying Convention: U.S. Resistance to the UN Treaty on Women’s Rights (Cambridge Univ. Press 2014). Here’s the abstract:
The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) articulates what has now become a global norm. CEDAW establishes the moral, civic, and political equality of women; women’s right to be free from discrimination and violence; and the responsibility of governments to take positive action to achieve these goals. The United States is not among the 187 countries that have ratified the treaty. To explain why the United States has not ratified CEDAW, this book highlights the emergence of the treaty in the context of the Cold War, the deeply partisan nature of women’s rights issues in the United States, and basic disagreements about how human rights treaties work.


Source: IntLawReporter

Schiele: Evolution of International Environmental Regimes: The Case of Climate Change
 
Simone Schiele (United Nations Environment Programme) has published Evolution of International Environmental Regimes: The Case of Climate Change (Cambridge Univ. Press 2014). Here’s the abstract:
Drawing specifically on the international climate regime, Simone Schiele examines international environmental regimes from a legal perspective and analyses a core feature of international regimes – their ability to evolve over time. In particular, she develops a theoretical framework based on general international law which allows for a thorough examination of the understanding of international law and the options for law-creation in international environmental regimes. The analysis therefore provides both a coherent understanding of the international climate regime and a starting point for further research in other regimes.

Source: IntLawReporter

New Issue: European Journal of International Law
 
The latest issue of the European Journal of International Law (Vol. 25, no. 3, August 2014) is out. Contents include:
•    Editorial
o    JHHW, Sleepwalking Again: The End of the Pax Americana 1914–2014; After Gaza 2014: Schabas; Peer Review Redux; In this Issue
•    Articles
o    Jan Klabbers, The Emergence of Functionalism in International Institutional Law: Colonial Inspirations
o    Michelle Leanne Burgis-Kasthala, Over-stating Palestine’s UN Membership Bid?An Ethnographic Study on the Narratives of Statehood
o    Mark Chinen, Complexity Theory and the Horizontal and Vertical Dimensions of State Responsibility
o    Joost Pauwelyn, Ramses A. Wessel, & Jan Wouters, When Structures Become Shackles: Stagnation and Dynamics in International Lawmaking
•    EJIL: Debate!
o    Mónica García-Salmones Rovira, The Politics of Interest in International Law
o    Jörg Kammerhofer, The Politics of Interest in International Law: A Reply to Mónica García-Salmones Rovira
o    Mónica García-Salmones Rovira, The Politics of Interest in International Law: A Rejoinder to Jörg Kammerhofer
•    Roaming Charges: Moments of Dignity: Keepers of the Sultan’s Treasures, Brunei Regalia Museum
•    The European Tradition in International Law: F.F. Martens
o    Lauri Mälksoo, F.F. Martens and His Time: When Russia Was an Integral Part of the European Tradition of International Law
o    Rein Müllerson, F.F. Martens – Man of the Enlightenment: Drawing Parallels between Martens’ Times and Today’s Problems
o    Rotem Giladi, The Enactment of Irony: Reflections on the Origins of the Martens Clause
o    Andreas T. Müller, Friedrich F. Martens on ‘The Office of Consul and Consular Jurisdiction in the East’
•    Critical Review of International Governance
o    Shashank P. Kumar & Cecily Rose, A Study of Lawyers Appearing before the International Court of Justice, 1999–2012
•    Review Essay
o    Gleider I. Hernández, The Judicialization of International Law: Reflections on the Empirical Turn

Source: IntLawReporter

Call for Contributors: Oxford Reports on International Law (Reports on International Trade Law Decisions)

The Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies, in collaboration with Oxford University Press, is in the process of editing a new module for the Oxford Reports on International Law. This module analyzes the case law of trade-related international dispute settlement systems, focusing on issues relating to public international law. The editors are looking for additional case note authors. Here’s the call:
The Oxford Reports on International Law (ORIL) brings together decisions on public international law from international law courts, domestic courts, and ad hoc tribunals, and is the most up-to-date source of international case law available. We are in the process of creating a new module for the ORIL provisionally entitled Reports on International Trade Law Decisions. This is the first database to provide expert commentary and analysis of case law of trade-related international dispute settlement systems, focusing on issues relating to public international law. In first instance, the database covers cases decided by, inter alia, the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Body (Panels and the Appellate Body), NAFTA and the Caribbean Court of Justice. So far, over 60 cases have been commissioned to contributors. Decisions of other tribunals, such as those of ASEAN, MERCOSUR and EFTA, are equally targeted. The development of the new module is led by the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies at the University of Leuven, under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Jan Wouters and Prof. Dr. Geert Van Calster.
We are currently looking for contributors that are experts in the fields of public international law, WTO law, and international trade law who would like to take part in the project. Contributors are asked to draft short case notes (around 1.000 words) on judgments from the abovementioned tribunals, insofar they are significant for public international law. You will of course be credited as the sole author, and each case note will be published in the Oxford Reports on International Law – Reports on International Trade Law Decisions module, to be launched by March 2015. Moreover, you may use case notes as the basis for a subsequent publication provided it is not identical (in which case consent from OUP would need to be asked), and due reference is made to the earlier OUP case note. Additionally, authors of case notes are to be compensated 45 EUR per note from Oxford University Press. In our experience, a case note takes around 2 days’ work.
If you are interested in becoming a contributor and are willing to contribute to this exciting project, please send us a short description of your background and experience, insofar relevant. If you have specific interests or expertise relevant to the project, feel free to suggest to author specific case notes. Please do keep in mind that many WTO cases have already been commissioned for head notes and may no longer be available. Considering the broad scope of this project, feel free to forward this invitation to equally qualified colleagues who may be interested to submit case notes.
Thank you in advance and we are at your disposal should you have additional queries. Please mail to dylan.geraets@law.kuleuven.be
Prof. Dr. Jan Wouters and Prof. Dr. Geert Van Calster, Editors
Dylan Geraets and Bregt Natens, Associate Editors

Source: IntLawReporter http://ilreports.blogspot.com/2014/11/white-cuban-embargo-under-international.html

White: The Cuban Embargo under International Law
 
Nigel D. White (Univ. of Nottingham – Law) has published The Cuban Embargo under International Law (Routledge 2015). Here’s the abstract:
The United States embargo against Cuba was imposed over fifty years ago initially as a response to the new revolutionary government’s seizure of US properties, which was viewed by the US as a violation of international law. However, while sanctions can be legitimate means of enforcing established norms, the Cuban embargo itself appears to be the wrongful act, and its persistence calls into question the importance and function of international law.
This book examines the history, legality and effects of US sanctions against Cuba and argues that the embargo has largely become a matter of politics and ideology; subjecting Cuba to apparently illegitimate coercion that has resulted in a prolonged global toleration of what appears to be a serious violation of international law. The book demonstrates how the Cuban embargo undermines the use of sanctions world-wide, and asks whether the refusal of world governments to address the illegality of the embargo reduces international law to tokenism where concepts of sovereign equality and non-intervention are no longer a priority. Despite the weaknesses of international law, Nigel D. White argues that in certain political conditions it will be possible to end the embargo as part of a bilateral agreement to restore normal relations between the US and Cuba and, furthermore, that such an agreement, if it is to succeed, will have to be shaped by the broad parameters of law and justice.

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