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oficina_17Call for Papers: Challenging Human Rights Disenchantment 50 years on from the ICCPR and ICESCR

Source: International Law Reporter 

The Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research at the University of Sussex has issued a call for papers for a conference on “Challenging Human Rights Disenchantment 50 years on from the ICCPR and ICESCR,” to take place January 27, 2017. Here’s the call:

The Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research at the University of Sussex will be hosting a conference on Friday 27 January 2017: Challenging Human Rights Disenchantment 50 Years on from the ICCPR and ICESCR

The Centre invites proposals for presentations that consider different forms (political, legal, social) of disenchantment with the state of human rights 50 years after the adoption of the International Covenants on Civil and Political Rights and on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Proposals should address a thematic human rights issue to consider how the issue is being, or might be, challenged. The closing date for proposals is Tuesday 6th September 2016.

On the basis of proposals received in response to this call, the conference steering group will decide on the thematic focus for each of up to six thematic sessions. Each thematic session will involve 10-15 minute presentations by three (or possibly four) panellists. The conference steering group aims to ensure that panellists comprise a mixture of senior and early career researchers, as well as postgraduate researchers, from different disciplines and from both within and outside the University of Sussex.

oficina_07

Leach & Donald: Parliaments and the European Court of Human Rights
Source: International Law Reporter 
Philip Leach (Middlesex Univ. – Law) & Alice Donald (Middlesex Univ. – Law) have published Parliaments and the European Court of Human Rights (Oxford Univ. Press 2016). Here’s the abstract:

The European system of human rights protection faces institutional and political pressures which threaten its very survival. These institional pressures stem from the backlog of applications before the European Court of Human Rights, the large number of its judgments that remain unimplemented, and the political pressures that arise from sustained attacks on the Court’s legitimacy and authority, notably from politicians and jurists in the United Kingdom.

This book addresses the theme which lies at the heart of these pressures: the role of national parliaments in the implementation of judgments of the Court. It combines theoretical and empirical insights into the role of parliaments in securing domestic compliance with the Court’s decisions, and provides detailed investigation of five European states with differing records of human rights compliance and parliamentary mobilisation: Ukraine, Romania, the United Kingdom, Germany, and the Netherlands.
How far are parliaments engaged in implementation, and how far should they be? Do parliaments advance or hinder human rights compliance? Is it ever justifiable for parliaments to defy judgments of the Court? And how significant is the role played by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe? Drawing on the fields of international law, international relations, political science, and political philosophy, the book argues that adverse human rights judgments not only confer obligations on parliamentarians but also create opportunities for them to develop influential interpretations of human rights and enhance their own democratic legitimacy. It makes an authoritative contribution to debate about the future of the European and other supranational human rights mechanisms and the broader relationship between democracy, human rights, and legitimate authority.

oficina_15Call for Papers: International Journal of Legal Research and Governance, Volume 2, Issue 3:
Source: Lawctopus 

About
International Journal of Legal Research and Governance (ISSN: 2394-7829) is Quarterly double blind Peer review academic journal, published Print, that seeks to provide an interactive forum for the publication of articles in the field of Law and Governance. The Journal is currently soliciting submissions for Volume 2, Issue 3.
We welcome submissions from academicians, practitioners, students, researchers and experts from within the legal community. We have a strong preference for articles that assert and defend a well-reasoned position.
I.J.L.R.G is a print Journal under the Chief patron of Hon. Justice K.N Saikia, Former Judge Supreme Court of India, Dr. Hon. Justice Malimath, Former Chief Justice Karnataka and Kerala High Court, Prof. (Dr.) M.P.Singh, Chancellor Central University, Haryana, Prof. (Dr.) Gurjeet Singh, Founder Vice-Chancellor N.L.U.J.A Assam, Prof. (Dr.) Faizan Mustaffa, V.C NALSAR Hyderabad, Prof. Shamnad Basheer and other luminaries from the legal fraternity.
Call for Papers
International Journal of Legal Research and Governance (IJLRG), ISSN 2394-7829 is a quarterly double blind peer reviewed journal. We look forward for submissions from members of the Bar, Bench and the academia. Submissions can be in the form of long articles, short articles, case comments, legislative notes and book reviews.
Deadline
The last date for submission of papers is 5th September, 2016.
Nature of Contributions
1. Articles: An article must conduct a complete analysis of the area of law, which the author seeks to highlight. It must contain a comprehensive study of the existing law, indicating the lacunae therein, and must contain an attempt to suggest possible changes which can address the said lacunae. An article should be between 4,000-5,000 words.

2. Essays: An essay is more adventurous as it challenges challenging existing paradigms/norms and provides a fresh outlook to common problems. It is strongly recommended that essays be considerably more concise than articles, in terms of scope and conceptualization. An essay is thus advised to be between 3,000-5,000 words.

3. Notes: A note is a relatively concise form of an argument advanced by the author. The focus of a note should be on a relatively new debate or controversy regarding the interpretation or implementation in the law. Notes shall primarily highlight contemporary issues, which need to be addressed, and the authors are expected to offer a solution. The maximum word limit for a manuscript in the form of note is 2,500 words.

4. Comments: A comment is where the author may decide to critique any recent/landmark judicial pronouncement or any recent legislation or bill before the Parliament or State Legislature. The word limit for a comment is 2,500 words.

Submission Guidelines

1. Word Limit: As has already been indicated, the maximum word limit for articles and essays is 5,000 words (exclusive of footnotes) whereas that for notes and comments is 2,500 words (exclusive of footnotes).

2. Citation Format: The citation format to be used is The Bluebook (19th ed.). In keeping with the same, speaking footnotes are discouraged.

3. Abstract: Every submission should be accompanied by an abstract of not more than 350 words describing the relevant conclusions drawn in the manuscript. Please note that there is no requirement of prior submission of abstract as the selection of the paper for publication shall be on the full manuscript. The abstract shall serve merely to help the Editorial Board in its review process.

4. Biographical Information of Authors: A separate document with biographical information of the authors must also be attached including the following details: Name, E mail address, Postal Address, Name and Address of Institution, Course (if applicable), Academic Year.
Plagiarism Guidelines

As per the International Journal of Legal Research and Governance Policy on Academic Misconduct, "plagiarism" means failure to acknowledge ideas or phrases from another source. Such source is not limited to published text. Acknowledgement of others work is expected even if the source was a discussion (whether oral or written) with another person, or use of materials on the internet.
1. Multiple submissions are not allowed: Multiple Submission means submitting the same, or largely the same, piece of work in more than one journal or competition, without written permission from the instructors involved and or recycling of any part of a previously written piece of work whether or not published without appropriate reference to their your own prior work. Prior permission shall be required if the recycled work forms more than 5% of the new work.

2. Misrepresenting work: Misrepresenting work prepared by another as one’s own means submitting work that has been prepared by someone else (whether for payment or not) as one’s own work. This would include instances where excessive help is taken from another person such that the assessment objective and intention of the assignment/ exercise is frustrated.

Note: It is assumed that work submitted is represented as being authored by the person on whose behalf it is submitted. Falsification of Work Product is falsifying, concocting or misrepresenting of data, statistics, or other observations/ information.
Submission

All submissions should be made electronically at ijlrgjournal@gmail.com

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