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Write On! Call for Papers: ‘Human Rights and Justice,’ Hague Institute for Global Justice (deadline 14 Nov.)

The human rights sections of the International Studies Association, the American Political Science Association, the European Consortium for Political Research, and the International Political Science Association are pleased to announce the fourth joint international conference on human rights, on the theme “Human Rights and Justice,” to take place 8 – 10 June 2015 at The Hague Institute for Global Justice. The conference will take place immediately before the annual meeting of the Academic Council on the United Nations System (11 – 13 June), also in The Hague.
This joint conference will ask researchers and policymakers from academia, think tanks, IOs and NGOs to deal with various aspects of justice and human rights. Papers should highlight how and to what extent human rights in all aspects and levels of governance, law and decision making allow or deny access to justice. This may include questions regarding whether and to what extent the international human rights regime can address adequately the challenges of human rights implementation and justice, as well as how regional, national, and local mechanisms may address human rights challenges. Paper and panel proposals that also address the issues such as climate justice, transitional justice or cyber justice as well as access to justice and global distributive justice are welcome. Some of the questions to be addressed at the conference include:
•    Are human rights and justice always compatible?
•    How do we conceptualize the relationship between human rights and justice?
•    What role does global distributive justice play in advancing human rights?
•    How do we ensure that domestic justice systems address a wide range of human rights issues?
•    Are international justice institutions (e.g. International Criminal Court, European Court of Human Rights, Inter-American Court, African Court on Human and People’s Rights) adequate for addressing human rights issues?
•    How have norms regarding justice and human rights evolved?

Submissions will open shortly. Please note that proposals must relate to the theme of the conference in some manner to be considered. Each full panel proposal should include exactly four papers plus a chair and discussant.
The deadline for submissions is 14 November 2014. Notification of acceptances will be sent by e-mail by 20 December 2014.
For more information, visit: http://global-human-rights.org/HRJ.html
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Call for Papers: The Judicialization of International Relations

The journal International Organization and the IO/IL working group of the Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies at Northwestern University have issued a call for papers for a workshop on “The Judicialization of International Relations” to take place June 12-13, 2015. Here’s the call:
The Judicialization of International Relations 2015 Workshop
A Workshop Sponsored by International Organization and the IO/IL working group of the Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies, Northwestern University
Karen J. Alter and Erik Voeten Co-Conveners
Application deadline: December 1, 2014 sent to judicializationconference@gmail.com
Workshop date: June 12-13, 2015
The end of the Cold War introduced a new era of international adjudication marked by the proliferation of international courts, an increased use of permanent and ad hoc international adjudicatory mechanisms, a widening of the issue areas that fall under the jurisdiction of adjudicatory bodies, and a rise in the domestic judicial enforcement of international laws, agreements, and court judgments. This workshop examines if and how the increased involvement of domestic and international judicial actors is transforming international relations; a process often referred to as the judicialization of politics.
Our common starting point is the judicialization in international relations via the introduction of a new set of institutions and actors with the authority to interpret and issue binding rulings involving international law. We define adjudicatory bodies broadly to include any institution, domestic or international, so long as it is composed of quasi-independent adjudicators that have the formal authority to issue binding legal determinations. This definition includes arbitral tribunals, ad hoc courts and domestic courts. Judicialization generates the possibility that decision-makers will begin to make decisions in the shadow of potential domestic and/or international judicial review.
The workshop will bring together scholars working on issues such as regional integration, terrorism, investment, trade, human rights, war crimes, law of the sea, the environment and other issue areas where adjudication is increasingly shaping international relations. We invite proposals for papers that make theoretical and/or empirical contributions towards understanding what, if any, effect this increased judicial application of international law has on international politics. Although we will consider papers that examine the causes and varied design of judicialized institutions, our primary interest is in the effects of judicialization in international relations. We especially welcome papers that address the following sets of issues (although we are open to others): Leer el resto de esta entrada »

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Go On! Advocacy and Litigation Training Course, Leiden University, The Hague

The Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies (Leiden University) welcomes registrations for its Advocacy and Litigation training course, which will be held in The Hague from 24 November to 28 November 2014. The training is open to law students and professionals who consider a career in international criminal litigation or who simply wish to develop or improve their advocacy skills. Participants will be trained in case theory, opening statements, direct examination (examination-in-chief), cross-examination, re-examination, closing statements and legal submissions skills through role play and challenging exercises. The course will be concluded with a mock trial at the end of the week.
The training will be given by Zafar Ali QC, a highly experienced defence lawyer who is on the list of Defence Counsel at the International Criminal Court. He has also been selected as Lead Defence Counsel at the UN Special Tribunal for Lebanon in The Hague. Zafar Ali will be assisted by Nathan Rasiah, who has worked on a number of high profile cases involving military and political leaders charged before international criminal tribunals.
The Grotius Centre also arranges visits to the ICC and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, welcome drinks and a course dinner. Participants will be awarded a certificate of participation. Leer el resto de esta entrada »

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Schultz & Kovacs: The Law is What the Arbitrator Had for Breakfast: How Income, Reputation, Justice, and Reprimand Act as Determinants of Arbitrator Behaviour

Thomas Schultz (King’s College London – Law) & Robert Kovacs (Univ. of Geneva – Law) have posted The Law is What the Arbitrator Had for Breakfast: How Income, Reputation, Justice, and Reprimand Act as Determinants of Arbitrator Behaviour (in Selected Topics in International Arbitration – Liber Amicorum for the 100th Anniversary of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, J.C. Betancourt ed., forthcoming). Here’s the abstract:
This paper examines the salient incentives and constraints that the current socio-legal system of arbitration places on arbitrators. In doing so, it mirrors the main steps taken by classical law and economics studies on judicial behaviour. It takes the main types of incentives and constraints identified in these studies and applies them to the behaviour of arbitrators. The rationale of the current study is that arbitrators, like everyone else, are maximisers of their own utility. The pursuit of that maximisation influences how they decide cases. The components of their utility are determinants of their behaviour. If we better comprehend these determinants – what influences and motivates the behaviour of arbitrators – we can better understand arbitration, and the law that applies and should apply to it, and the law created by it.
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Call for submissions: The Washington College of Law Human Rights Essay Award 2015 English and Spanish
 
Are you interested in attending an all-expense paid 3 week summer program on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law taught by over 40 world-renowned practitioners and academics at American University Washington College of Law? Well, now is your chance! Submit an essay to the Human Rights Essay Award Competition and you could be the lucky winner to receive a scholarship to attend the 2015 Program of Advanced Studies in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. This year’s topic is “Transitional Justice, International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law” and the deadline to submit is February 1, 2015. Participants have the flexibility to choose any subject related to the assigned topic. The best articles may be published in the American University International Law Review.
This annual competition sponsored by the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. The Academy will grant two Awards, one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. The Award in each case will consist of: a scholarship to the Academy’s Program of Advanced Studies, travel expenses to Washington D.C., housing at the university dorms and a per diem for living expenses. For detailed guidelines about the award please visit:http://www.wcl.american.edu/hracademy/hraward.cfm or contact us at:hracademy@wcl.american.edu Leer el resto de esta entrada »

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Darcy: Judges, Law and War: The Judicial Development of International Humanitarian Law
 
Shane Darcy (National Univ. of Ireland, Galway – Irish Centre for Human Rights) has published Judges, Law and War: The Judicial Development of International Humanitarian Law (Cambridge Univ. Press 2014). Here’s the abstract:
International courts and judicial bodies play a formative role in the development of international humanitarian law. Judges, Law and War examines how judicial bodies have influenced the substantive rules and principles of the law of armed conflict, and studies the creation, application and enforcement of this corpus of laws. Specifically, it considers how international courts have authoritatively addressed the meaning and scope of particular rules, the application of humanitarian law treaties and the customary status of specific norms. Key concepts include armed conflicts and protected persons, guiding principles, fundamental guarantees, means and methods of warfare, enforcement and war crimes. Consideration is also given to the contemporary place of judicial bodies in the international law-making process, the challenges presented by judicial creativity and the role of customary international law in the development of humanitarian law.
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Jensen: The Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf: Law and Legitimacy

Øystein Jensen (Fridtjof Nansen Institute) has published The Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf: Law and Legitimacy (Brill | Nijhoff 2014). Here’s the abstract:
As the world’s coastal states go about dividing up the ocean floor, the work of the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf plays an increasingly important role. The Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf: Law and Legitimacy examines the Commission from two different but interrelated perspectives: a legal analysis of the Commission’s decision-making; and a study of normative legitimacy related to the Commission and its procedures. Insights into the history of the development of the concept of the continental shelf in the law of the sea are offered, including an explanation of how the institutionalized method for ascertaining continental shelf limits in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea came into being. Through a deep-ranging analysis of the Commission and its work, the book introduces a framework for assessing best practices, and will serve as a useful reference for academics, scientists and policymakers alike.

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